Floral

There has been a fair amount of research done on the effect of art on patients as a visual experience and as a hands-on experience in the form of art therapy.

As an art consultant, I do a lot of medical clinics — from pediatrics, to oncology, to mental health, to hospitals and basic family practices. There is a science-based reason for why you see so much nature and florals on the walls of doctor’s offices. Authors Roger Ulrich and Laura Gilpin explored this topic thoroughly in their study and subsequent publication “Healing Arts: Nutrition for the Soul.” Combining scientific research and anecdotal field work, they developed art selection guidelines widely used for the healthcare industries. You can find out more about these guidelines at the Center for Health Design’s website at www.healthdesign.org/chd/research/guide-evidence-based-art but the essence is that depictions of nature are calming and provoke feelings of peace and well-being in us.

The Cleveland Clinic’s own studies on patient experience with art in hospitals and clinics went further to suggest that the art should not call attention to the patient’s suffering, but rather help them to feel comfortable and soothed. In my own work, there are some obvious choices to be made for certain clinics, and some not-so-obvious things to consider and avoid. The simplest approach is often the best, and for pediatric facilities, art full of color and playfulness make the most sense. The more quirky and active, the better for helping to distract kids from whatever has brought them to the doctor, or dentist, in the first place. People who must return again and again to a clinic because of chronic suffering benefit from relaxing and soothing images that create a positive “escape” or dreamland (here comes the nature part) but consideration should be made to rotating artwork because of the repetitive nature of these visits.

I would point out Providence Cancer Center as a top example of floral and landscape choice. Photographs of aspirational imagery, e.g. emotionally positive examples of humans being active perhaps despite physical imitations are a good choice for physical therapy centers. Before and after pictures of actual patients can be artfully displayed under certain circumstances like medical spas and orthodontists.

One area that is often overlooked during planning is the exam rooms. A patient may feel relaxed in your beautifully outfitted waiting room, but if your exam room is full of medical diagrams and pictures of ailments provided by the pharmaceutical company, I would hazard a guess that heart rates are going to rise again while they wait for the doc. Take into consideration what brought your patient to the clinic to begin with, and be sensitive to their complete journey from waiting room to exam room to check-out. Some “no-nos” I have seen include too much red in a cardiovascular clinic, pictures of babies and children in a reproductive medicine office, and posters of childhood diseases in a pediatrician’s exam rooms. It’s great to think outside the box — after all, who wants to see another X-ray image of a floral? Your art consultant has the experience and research to help you identify the best fit for your clinic and your patient.

So there I was, minding my own business, when I ran into my old friend and local NW artist, Molly Cliff Hilts.
Molly and I go way back — she is one of the first artists I hung when I was starting out as an art consultant and framer. I hung her Giclée prints in 2007 for Care Oregon. Her work is full of life and color. It’s a great fit for large spaces like commercial lobbies, open restaurants (you can check out Molly’s work at Manzana Grill in Lake Oswego) as well as the Teardrop lounge in NW Portland and other places where viewers can approach the work from a distance.

It seemed fortuitous that I would run into Molly — her work would make the perfect fit to inaugurate the new studio gallery space I have just taken with Red Flower Productions down in the vibrant NE industrial area just off of Interstate Avenue. The neighborhood is flourishing with new creative spaces and retail and restaurants like Beam & Anchor and Broder Nord.

Molly wanted a chance to hang some of her older works that haven’t been seen in awhile. We are going to show some of the Encaustics that feature fruit and foliage — perfect pieces for a restaurant or larger private kitchen/dining room.

Molly’s encaustics really draw you in. They catch the eye and then inspire the viewer to look more closely in a process of discovery. The work appears surreal at first, and it challenges you to linger upon it as your eye-mind connection makes sense of the image. They can give you a really satisfying “a-ha” moment.

The pieces range from $4800k – $6600k and in size from 50″×30″ to 60″×60″. I invite you to join us April 23 from 5-7pm for a wine and cheese reception celebrating our new studio and to see the works in person. You may also call (503) 349-0587 to set up an appointment.

Join us!

Opening celebration of Perodesign and Red Flower Productions new studio gallery
April 23rd, 5pm – 7pm
Location 820 N River Street, Portland, Oregon 97227

The patient experience begins when they walk in your office door. Art chosen to suit and brighten your reception area will provide attractive and calming spaces for patients to relax and gather their thoughts before their health care visit.

Jonathan Nourok's photographs of flowers and leaves are filled with bold colors and evocative shapes that are both familiar and wondrous. His images provide space for the eyes and mind to wander. Whether the appointment is routine or emergent, Jonathan Nourok's close up floral-scapes will transform your reception or patient rooms into cheerful and calming spaces.

Whatever the color story or visual style that best suits your practice, the artist can accommodate. Prioritize your patient experience with detailed and dynamite artwork from one of the West Coast's best!

The patient experience begins when they walk in your office door. Art chosen to suit and brighten your reception area will provide attractive and calming spaces for patients to relax and gather their thoughts before their health care visit.

Jonathan Nourok’s photographs of flowers and leaves are filled with bold colors and evocative shapes that are both familiar and wondrous. His images provide space for the eyes and mind to wander.

Whether the appointment is routine or emergent, Jonathan Nourok’s close up floral-scapes will transform your reception or patient rooms into cheerful and calming spaces. Whatever the color story or visual style that best suits your practice, the artist can accommodate.

Poppy Flax Triptych by onathan Nourok

Poppy Flax Triptych by onathan Nourok

Prioritize your patient experience with detailed and dynamite artwork from one of the West Coast’s best! [/vc_column]